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Advice from the UK government is rapidly changing as more is learned about the virus. We are updating this information as new guidance becomes available. We understand that many of you will be very worried and have lots of questions. We will do our best to support you through these difficult times.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Pregnant And Pumping Iron: Fitness Instructor Deadlifts 205lbs

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Woman Gives Birth Only 30 Minutes After Finding Out She's Pregnant - I Didn't Know I Was Pregnant

Pregnant and worried about the new coronavirus?

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Although there are currently no data showing that COVID affects pregnant people differently than others, we do know that pregnant people are at greater risk of getting sick from other respiratory viruses than people who are not pregnant. Sometimes, this causes adverse outcomes for the mother or child. Therefore, if you are pregnant, be mindful about reducing your risk of getting sick. You can also teach your children everyday steps such as proper handwashing to stay healthy:.

CDC recommends that everyone 2 years and older wear a cloth face covering that covers their nose and mouth when they are out in the community. B ecause of the danger of suffocation, do NOT put cloth face coverings on babies or children younger than 2 years.

Parents and other caregivers should keep in mind that wearing a cloth face covering is not a substitute for social distancing, frequent hand washing, or other everyday preventive actions — please wear your cloth face covering in addition to practicing other prevention steps. A cloth face covering is not intended to protect you, the wearer, but it may prevent you from spreading the virus to others. Please remember that medical face masks and N95 respirators are reserved for healthcare personnel and other first responders.

Learn more about cloth face coverings. However, much remains unknown. We do know that pregnant people have had a higher risk of severe illness when infected with viruses that are similar to COVID, as well as other viral respiratory infections, such as influenza.

We also know that pregnant people have changes in their bodies that may increase their risk of some infections. Therefore, if you are pregnant, it is always important for you to try to protect yourself from illnesses whenever possible. Do not skip your prenatal care appointments or postpartum appointments. If you are concerned about attending your appointment due to COVID, talk to your healthcare provider.

Although there is no vaccine available to protect against the virus that causes COVID, routine vaccines are an important part of protecting your health. Receiving some vaccines during pregnancy, such as the influenza flu and Tdap vaccines, can help protect you and your baby. If you are pregnant, you should continue to receive your recommended vaccines. Talk with your healthcare provider about visits for vaccines during pregnancy. Delivering your baby is always safest under the supervision of trained healthcare professionals.

If you have questions about the best place to deliver your baby, discuss them with your healthcare provider. There is much more to be learned about how this disease affects children. Related: Children and youth with special healthcare needs. Plastic face shields for newborns and infants are NOT recommended.

There are no data supporting the use of infant face shields for protection against COVID or other respiratory illnesses. Infants, including newborns, move frequently, which could increase the possibility of their nose and mouth becoming blocked by the plastic face shield or foam components. Additional information on how to protect yourself and others , including newborns and infants, from COVID illness is also available.

Newborn visits. At the newborn visit, your pediatric healthcare provider will also check how you and your baby are doing overall. Newborn screening tests include a bloodspot, hearing test, and test for critical congenital heart defects.

Learn more about newborn screening tests. Well child visits. Vaccine visits. Vaccines are an important part of keeping your child healthy, especially if your child is under 2 years old. Vaccines help provide immunity before being exposed to potentially life-threatening diseases. This will help to prevent outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases among young children during the COVID pandemic. Ask your healthcare provider how they are taking steps to separate healthy patients from those who may be sick.

Some health care providers may choose to delay visits like well child checks and routine vaccine visits. Pandemics can be stressful for everyone. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in both adults and children.

Coping successfully with stress will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger. Talk with your children about the pandemic. It is important to try to stay calm and to give children information that is truthful and appropriate for their ages and developmental levels.

Children respond differently to stressful situations than adults. Depression during and after pregnancy is common and can be treated. Postpartum depression is depression that can happen after having a baby. If you think you may be experiencing depression, seek treatment from your health care provider as soon as possible.

Find more information on depression during and after pregnancy. Pregnant people and parents caring for young children may be experiencing increased stress due to the COVID pandemic. CDC offers resources to help with Stress and Coping. Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to A-Z link. Coronavirus Disease Section Navigation. Minus Related Pages. On This Page. Learn more about how to reduce the risk of SIDS.

What's this? Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website. You will be subject to the destination website's privacy policy when you follow the link. CDC is not responsible for Section compliance accessibility on other federal or private website. Cancel Continue.

Pregnancy and coronavirus: information for pregnant women

When you have found out that you are pregnant, there are a lot of things you need to know. Sometimes just knowing where to start and which information you can trust can be a challenge. On the following pages you will find out information of the various tests and scans you will need, what is safe for both you and your baby and what are the best lifestyle changes you might need to make to have a healthy pregnancy and baby. We also have information on how your baby will develop and grow over the next nine months and also some of the common issues that most women encounter during their pregnancy.

COVID, the disease caused by a new coronavirus, has rapidly spread globally and is now a pandemic, according to the World Health Organization. Many of my pregnant patients have expressed concerns, both for themselves and their babies, about the impact of COVID on their health. Together, we reviewed the extremely limited data available to provide evidence-based responses below.

Pregnancy info is everywhere. Many pregnant women feel the nesting instinct, a powerful urge to prepare their home for the baby by cleaning and decorating. As your due date draws closer, you may find yourself cleaning cupboards or washing walls — things you never would have imagined doing in your ninth month of pregnancy! But be careful not to overdo it.

10 Things That Might Surprise You About Being Pregnant

Congratulations, and welcome to your pregnancy! From what to expect each week to how to prepare for labor and beyond, here's the info you need. The educational health content on What To Expect is reviewed by our medical review board and team of experts to be up-to-date and in line with the latest evidence-based medical information and accepted health guidelines, including the medically reviewed What to Expect books by Heidi Murkoff. This educational content is not medical or diagnostic advice. Use of this site is subject to our terms of use and privacy policy. Getting Pregnant. First Year.

If You Are Pregnant, Breastfeeding, or Caring for Young Children

Although there are currently no data showing that COVID affects pregnant people differently than others, we do know that pregnant people are at greater risk of getting sick from other respiratory viruses than people who are not pregnant. Sometimes, this causes adverse outcomes for the mother or child. Therefore, if you are pregnant, be mindful about reducing your risk of getting sick. You can also teach your children everyday steps such as proper handwashing to stay healthy:. CDC recommends that everyone 2 years and older wear a cloth face covering that covers their nose and mouth when they are out in the community.

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Know what to expect during pregnancy and learn about pregnancy symptoms, nutrition, fitness, labor & delivery, week by week pregnancy information and more.

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